Photos / Sounds

Observer

justher88

Date

June 18, 2022 11:46 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

sea-kangaroo

Date

March 24, 2022 02:56 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Checker Lily (Fritillaria affinis)

Observer

matt_g

Date

April 23, 2021 02:21 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jorgehvaldez

Date

April 21, 2021 07:46 AM PDT

Description

Sierra La Asamblea

Photos / Sounds

What

Whiteleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos viscida)

Observer

marivillasol

Date

February 21, 2022 10:27 AM PST

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

marivillasol

Date

February 21, 2022 10:00 AM PST

Photos / Sounds

What

Indian Manzanita (Arctostaphylos mewukka)

Observer

sapienshane

Date

February 12, 2022 12:19 PM PST

Description

No burl

Photos / Sounds

What

Parry Manzanita (Arctostaphylos parryana)

Observer

sendyhdez

Date

April 25, 2020 03:58 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Tahoe Tonestus (Tonestus eximius)

Observer

matsonburger

Date

August 6, 2005 01:01 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)

Observer

arkstorm

Date

March 22, 2021 02:39 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

randomtruth

Date

January 2022

Description

Wacky manzanita in an area of Arctostaphylos canescens and Arctostaphlos crustacea. No burl, blooming at same time as A. canescens. But the leaves are more strigose than felty, are oddly shaped and almost auriculate (A. andersonii characters?), and setose hairs can occasionally be found on the stems and petioles.

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Date

December 31, 2021 01:27 PM PST

Description

Pic 6 adaxial, 7 abaxial. Biggest leaf I could find is 2.7cm tall x 1.8 wide. Pygmy forest acid soils. Right next to nummularia mendecinoensis and a glaucous weirdo.

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

kvandevere

Date

December 31, 2021 02:32 PM PST

Description

In the middle of a large mixed stand of A. tomentosa and A. hookeri, this individual stands out - mainly due to its tiny leaves. It is upright, 2+ meters tall, and has no visible burl (I was also unable to find a burl by digging with my fingers, but there are several large stems suggesting a deeply buried burl is possible). The stems are as red and smooth as the surrounding hookeri, but the twigs are white and nonglandular puberulent to tomatose (although there are minute black spots on some twigs suggesting some glandularity). The leaves are only 1-2cm long, strongly bifacial, abaxially tomentose, and sparsely hairy above. They are similar in color to the surrounding tomentosa (much duller than the hookeri). The raceme-like (0-1 branches) nascent inflorescence is pendant and minutely nonglandular hairy (similar to the twigs) with leaf-like, lanceolate bracts. It shows no sign of preparing to bloom, putting it out of sync with both the tomentosa (which is already blooming) and the hookeri (which is about to start). I only found one berry that wasn't hollow and it appeared to have a fused nut – although it could have just gotten stuck together as it decayed.

So is this some kind of cross-clade tomentosa/hookeri hybrid? A really unusual A. crustacea crinita with a hidden burl? Or just one of the many, many obligate seeders I've never heard of?

The leaf comparison photo has the subject plant on the left followed by a hookeri leaf and a tomentosa leaf. The third photo shows it growing side by side with hookeri.

Photos / Sounds

What

Wideleaf Rabbitbrush (Ericameria parryi var. latior)

Date

August 21, 2018 04:36 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

alex_wentworth

Date

December 6, 2021 02:52 PM PST

Description

Looks most to me like a. hookeri, except out of range AFAIK. Does not appear to be cultivated, there were similar plants on another roadcut to the south.

-burl not present
-tomentose, non-glandular hair on new growth
-extremely prostrate growth habit
-panicles extremely tiny (could not get in focus) with brown scaly bracts similar to a. hookeri, smaller than a. montana

Photos / Sounds

What

Pointleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens)

Observer

tchester

Date

November 22, 2021 11:13 AM PST

Description

This isn't actually a good A. pungens; it is a hybrid between A. glauca and A. pungens, discovered by Morgan Stickrod eight months earlier:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/72000194

Unfortunately, iNat doesn't have a way to identify this as a hybrid, so it has to be given one of the parent names.

This is a clear hybrid:

  • the color of the plant is dead intermediate between the two parents.
  • The leaf shape is intermediate between the parents.
  • The twig hairs are variable on this plant, with some being like mom, and some being like dad.
  • The nascent infl is variable, with some like A. glauca and some like A. pungens.

Both parent species are found a short distance up SR78. The closest A. pungens along the road is here:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/101895779

The closest A. glauca along the road is here:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/101744692

Many thanks to Morgan for discovering this plant and posting it at iNat!

Photos / Sounds

What

San Benito Pentachaeta (Pentachaeta exilis ssp. aeolica)

Date

May 2021

Photos / Sounds

What

Baja California Birdbush (Ornithostaphylos oppositifolia)

Observer

jrebman

Date

May 25, 2021 11:31 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Baja California Birdbush (Ornithostaphylos oppositifolia)

Observer

dmariana

Date

April 24, 2020 10:37 AM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

August 24, 2010 10:17 PM PDT

Description

This nice patch is right on the bank of Hwy 20. By the blue glaucous color and prostrate habit, I would say they are viscida x nevadensis @sapienshane @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

August 23, 2010 12:05 AM PDT

Description

Small mixed population of nevadensis, patula and viscida and some apparent hybrids. They didn't look like the nevadensis x viscida hybrids seen near by. Maybe patula involved? Very easy to get to these, they are right above Hwy 20 @sapienshane @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

January 27, 2012 05:18 PM PST

Description

A. canescens x nevadensis ssp. nevadensis. Location is from memory, may be a little off, but they were right along the Happy Camp-O'Brien Rd. near the summit in plain sight. Both parent species next too hybrids. Area has recently burned. The road was closed this year. @sapienshane @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

January 27, 2012 02:55 PM PST

Description

Location is from memory - could be slightly off. A. viscida ssp. pulchella and A. nevadensis knightii were in area and likely parent species. @sapienshane @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

June 5, 2012 12:00 PM PDT

Description

Apparent hybrid between A. nortensis x nevadensis knightii. Both parent species in area. @sapienshane @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

June 24, 2014 08:03 PM PDT

Description

A. columbiana x nevadensis with both parent species present. @sapienshane @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

sapienshane

Date

October 2, 2021 11:58 AM PDT

Description

Nevadensis hybrid? Viscida and patula in immediate vicinity

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

October 15, 2010 06:06 PM PDT

Description

One of the most interesting hybrid swarms I have ever seen. Acres of extremely variable plants. A. nevadensis, mewukka, viscida, patula all present at this location. I've been trying to get Mike Vasey and Tom Parker to check out this spot for years! Not sure if any of the nevadensis is "pure" nevadensis. All of it seems to be integrated with other genes. Fairly low elevation for nevadensis for this region. A lot of other interesting plants also present at this location (Calochortus coeruleous, Calochortus nudus/minimus and hybrids between this one and coeruleous, Erythronium purpurescens - very low elevation for this one). @morganstickrod @dgreenberger

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

August 25, 2010 08:36 PM PDT

Description

Apparent hybrid between nevadensis and mewukka var. mewukka. These plants have inflorescence similar to mewukka, burl, and low spreading habit like nevadensis. @morganstickrod

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

jeffbisbee

Date

March 23, 2010 12:13 AM PDT

Description

Arctostaphylos tomentosa var. bracteosa x pumila @morganstickrod Both parent species also present at this location.

Photos / Sounds

What

Queen of the Andes (Puya raimondii)

Observer

caminante

Date

October 2016

Photos / Sounds

What

Chaparral Pea (Pickeringia montana)

Observer

dpom

Date

May 3, 2015 03:04 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

syncaris

Date

October 25, 2019 01:50 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Microseris Stem Gall Wasp (Antistrophus microseris)

Observer

arbonius

Date

April 19, 2021 03:23 PM PDT

Description

Globular stem gall on Microseris sp....most likely M. douglasii...but based on my photos, I'm currently unable to verify species using the Jepson eFlora key. The nodding heads and phyllaries in this CalPhotos image are a good match, though there is also a record of M. bigelovii from the locale.

[As an aside, I found it amusing that the adaxial dark-red mid-ribs of the tepals in the Brodiaea terrestris...seen growing in the background in both photos...matched so well with the similar mid-ribs of the Microseris phyllaries. ;-].

Beyond James Bailey's iNat post under Antistrophus microseris, the only reference I could find for a stem gall on Microseris is in:

McCracken, Isabel; Egbert, Dorothy (1922). "California gall-making Cynipidae, with descriptions of new species". Stanford University Publications, University Series, Biological Sciences. 3 (1): 5–70.

...where the original description of "Aylax microseris" is given on pg. 47. The species is referred to as Antistrophus microseris on this Wikipedia page...a name change also recognized on iNat.

The gall is described as "an irregular stem swelling" of "diameter 10-20 mm" and "length 20-30 mm", and is illustrated in Plate 1, Fig. 10 (to view, scroll down 3 pages from here). The gall here doesn't seem particularly irregular to me, and Fig. 10 shows longitudinal veins I see only vaguely intimated in the photo...but overall the match seems the best current alternative out there. The locale here is only a few miles from the type locality of Aylax microseris.

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Manzanita (Arctostaphylos manzanita)

Observer

anthropogen

Date

February 21, 2018 10:19 AM MST

Photos / Sounds

What

Pointleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens)

Observer

ppluxo

Date

February 28, 2008 09:34 AM MST

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberries and Manzanitas (Genus Arctostaphylos)

Observer

alvarosj

Date

February 28, 2021 08:47 AM PST

Photos / Sounds

What

Dryobates Woodpeckers (Genus Dryobates)

Observer

madily

Date

September 7, 2020 01:49 PM PDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Guatemala Manzanita (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi ssp. cratericola)

Observer

peterburke

Date

March 13, 2018 06:14 PM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Marin Manzanita (Arctostaphylos virgata)

Observer

marionanoiram

Date

January 2019

Photos / Sounds

What

Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Observer

sydcannings

Date

September 27, 2019 04:26 PM PDT

Description

first time I've seen a bear eating bear berries!

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