Photos / Sounds

Observer

crb5

Date

October 31, 2019 02:19 PM PDT

Description

PMP-MBNMS-SEC
5x 10ft tow
100x + camera zoom
Bright field + dark field microscope

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

truong_c_904

Date

February 6, 2019 05:37 PM EST

Description

protist
Observed under microscope under 100x lens
https://www.britannica.com/science/dinoflagellate

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

cmiklaszewsk

Date

February 7, 2019 10:47 AM EST

Description

Tiny moving circles gliding across the slide. Structural colonies of dinoflagellates. https://www.britannica.com/science/Ceratium; Observation made in the University of South Florida.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

What

Dinoflagellates and Allies (Phylum Miozoa)

Observer

urdaneta_g_907

Date

February 8, 2019 07:39 PM EST

Description

Observation Description:
This organism is a Dinoflagellate (Phylum Miozoa) and it belongs to the Kingdom Protista. While searching under the microscope, we came across a protist that resembled the shape of a sea shell. It was microscopic in size, and seemed to have two flagella. Its color was light green and yellow. It also contained white color in it as well. The characteristic that determined that it was from the Kingdom Protista was its microscopic size and two flagella. It seemed to have a hard shell which represents its cellulose plates. According to Wikipedia, dinoflagellates are unicellular and possess two flagella. They have cellulose plates that act as protective armor. Half are photosynthetic and the other half are heterotrophic. They tend to be responsible for the red tide. They form mutualistic relationships with coral. They acquired the ability to photosynthesize through secondary endosymbiosis of a red algae (Source: Wikipedia).

Location, Habitat, and Distribution:
I observed this organism in my biology lab. According to the TA, a sample was taken from a pond at the University of South Florida. It was collected from a portion of Castor beach that was exposed to sunlight. Lat: 28.063082 Lon: -82.411015. Their habitats include all aquatic environments such as marine, fresh water, ponds, and even snow or ice. They are distributed almost anywhere there is water. They are abundant in both marine and freshwater environments (Source: Wikipedia).

Date and Time: February 8, 2019 at 7:39 PM EST

References:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinoflagellate

Kingdom Protista

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Leading
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

siler_h_014

Date

February 7, 2019 09:48 AM EST

Description

Water sample collected from the shady area of a pond on the University of South Florida campus. Possibly Genus Ceratium (it the upper left hand edge of the water sample) and Genus Micrasterias (indicated by the black pointer) present in the sample.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

jonathanray7807

Date

February 4, 2019 12:42 PM EST

Description

This was looked at under a microscope in a lab environment. The looks of it make me believe that it is a Ceratium because of the fact that it has a horn, two flagella, and what look like armored plates. https://www.britannica.com/science/Ceratium

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kim-markus

Date

February 5, 2019

Place

USF (Google, OSM)

Description

Microscopic organism observed at 400x total magnification. Diamond shaped body with 3 skinny appendages. I made this classification with the help of the following website
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceratium
It states of the organism that "most species of Ceratium are unicellular organisms that are characterized by their armored plates, two flagella, and horns. Species of Ceratium are found worldwide and are of concern due to their blooms"

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

daelenerodr

Date

February 7, 2019 10:50 AM EST

Description

water sample from a shaded area in a lake, protist of some sort. two small, green protists. microscopic. fork-like shape.

Reference:
https://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/resources/identification/algae/identification-guide/identify/guide/descriptions/dinoflagellates

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

avoulgarakis

Date

February 4, 2019 09:18 AM EST

Description

Microscopic organism found in a pond on USF campus. It is light green with an almost transparent body. It has three flagella to help it swim around the slide. It is accompanied by other microscopic organisms.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

ademc23

Date

February 4, 2019 07:26 PM EST

Description

•This is a dinoflagellate, which belongs under the kingdom Protista. It has a very distinctive shape, like all dinoflagellates do. The front has a rough peak whilst the back slide splits into two fin like structures. It is microscopic and under the microscope has a golden brown color, possible due to the secondary symbiosis with rad algae. The one defining characteristic was its distinct shape and color.
•This particular dinoflagellate was found in a sample of water that was taken at Castor beach at the University of South Florida, more specifically the area of the pond that has no shade covering it. This observation that you see under the microscope was done on Monday, February 4th, 2019.
•The dinoflagellate subside in marine habitats, and are really found all over the world.
https://www.britannica.com/science/dinoflagellate

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

bramirez3

Date

February 4, 2019 09:03 AM EST
Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tanase_s_002

Date

February 4, 2019 11:32 AM EST

Description

This organism was found during a lab exercise in class. A sample of pond water was taken from Castor Pond on campus. I know that this is a dinoflagellate because of its unique shape. Dinoflagellates are part of the Kingdom Protista and are commonly found in fresh water. This organism is also quite small, with a golden brown color and also possesses two flagella for movement.
https://www.britannica.com/science/dinoflagellate

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

alexisofthesea

Date

February 4, 2019 11:17 AM EST

Description

May be another species of /Ceratium/ genus. Pale green, swims by twisting/spinning, 400x magnification with tiny air bubble for scale. Looks vaguely like a rock-n-roll hand, which indicates the genus. Viewed in laboratory but obtained from sample of pond water at Castor Beach.
https://www.eoas.ubc.ca/research/phytoplankton/dinoflagellates/ceratium/c_furca.html

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

keg6

Date

February 7, 2019 10:04 PM EST

Description

Kingdom Protist. Smallish oval shaped dinoflagellates with a yellowish almost translucent color. Viewed at 100X magnification and can be anywhere from 70-500um in length. They are characterized by armored plates, flagella, and horns. Found in a shaded area of a pond at USF. Known to be in marine or freshwater areas with mild temperatures.

http://oceandatacenter.ucsc.edu/PhytoGallery/Dinoflagellates/ceratium.html

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

branham_t_018

Date

February 5, 2019 05:36 PM EST

Description

Giraffe shaped organisms observed in biodiversity lab. Commonly recognized as Dinoflagellates within the SAR clade. Observed on February 5, 2019 at 5:36 PM in a laboratory setting. Classified under Kingdom Protista. They are commonly found in aquatic environments in both the northern and southern hemispheres of the world.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10531-007-9258-3

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

elena_kostenko

Date

February 8, 2019 11:48 AM EST

Description

Asymmetrical aquatic unicellular organism with horn-like structures. I can assume that it is a photosynthetic organism due to its color.

Observation was made under microscope with 100x magnification. Water sample was obtained from Castor pond (USF Tampa).

Reference: http://www.algaebase.org/search/genus/detail/?genus_id=43626&sk=0

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

patel_a_001

Date

February 4, 2019 09:19 AM EST

Description

Initial Description: Organism in the center, there are 3 in this picture, one below it and one above it near the top. Small green colored organism with two spiny ends on one side with one spiny end shorter than the other. The other side of the organism has one long spiny end. The center of the organism is green with the spiny ends on both sides clear.

Specific Characteristic: The presence of the horns on either side and chromatophores with green pigment shows that this organism is a ceratium.

Reference: https://www.britannica.com/science/Ceratium

Habitat: Found in fresh water and salt water.

Geographic Distribution: Found in many diverse places in the world, anywhere from tropics to the arctic.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

osenova_r_10

Date

February 28, 2019

Description

This is a water sample taken from the shaded area of Castor Beach. The species had the two cellulose plates and long three sharp flagellates. This species lives in aquatic environments near zooplankton of marine and freshwater ecosystems (http://tolweb.org/Dinoflagellates/2445). Most Dinoflagellates can be found on the coasts around the United States, from the east to the west. Not many Dinoflagellates are found on the inlands of continents.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

longo_l_005

Date

February 5, 2019 11:41 AM EST

Description

Looks to be a dinoflagellate it is very hard to tell but I do know it is a protist due to the size and location of discovery. This was taken from a sample of pond water from USF's campus in an unshaded area. It has roughly the shape of the dinoflagellate along with its coloration. These protist are found in water and the cause for red tide in florida.
https://www.britannica.com/science/dinoflagellate

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

hughes_m_2

Date

February 4, 2019 11:00 AM EST

Description

Description: This protist has three horns, two adjacent at the top and one at the bottom. This organism is green which means it has chloroplasts and can photosynthesize. It has an armored body.
http://oceandatacenter.ucsc.edu/PhytoGallery/Dinoflagellates/ceratium.html
https://www.britannica.com/science/Ceratium
Habitat: This organism was found in the freshwater pond at USF. This is a man-made pond, however, these organisms have found a habitat in the water.
Geographical Distribution: These are common in freshwater and saltwater from the Arctic to the Tropics.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

moore_b_10

Date

February 4, 2019 05:31 PM EST

Description

The organisms were observed under a microscope from Castor Pond. The dinoflagellates moved in a swirling motion. They had one pointed flagellum, visible from 40x mag.

Reference: https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/protista/dinoflagellata.html

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

ferrera_b_15

Date

February 7, 2019 03:31 PM EST

Description

These dinoflagellates were observed in pond water B during the protist lab at USF on February 7th, 2019 at around 3:30pm. This pond water was taken from the Beach at Castor in a shaded area and observed under a compound microscope. The temperature of the room was normal room temperature, maybe about 73 degrees Fahrenheit. These dinoflagellates were swimming fast so it was difficult to obtain a good video of them, but these were the best pictures I could get. It is hard to make out specifics on the dinoflagellates besides the transverse groove in the center of them and the fact that they are a yellowish color. This organism was observed at a total magnification of 40X. The dinoflagellates looks about the size a index finger nail, they are small. Observing live specimens under a microscope is honestly so interesting because you would never guess such tiny organisms exist and are in just a small reach of you.

References: http://tolweb.org/Dinoflagellates/2445
http://www.biologydiscussion.com/protists/dinoflagellates-structure-and-reproduction-protists/52103

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Date

February 4, 2019 03:10 PM EST

Description

Kingdom Protista
This is photograph of a dinoflagellate that I took in my lab class that was retrieved from a pond on my urban campus. Dinoflagellates are marine plankton. Dinoflagellates have two flagella: one heterotrophic and the other photosynthetic (shown in the photo above) which help it to move throughout the water. Some have cellulose plates. You can also see the apical horns of the dinoflagellate in this observation. Many dinoflagellates are responsible for red tide. Red tide the when the population of the dinoflagellate blooms. The dinoflagellate can produce toxic chemical that harms and can kill other marine life. They may also harm the animals that consume marine organisms as a part of their diet such as birds. This microscopic, brown organism can also be bioluminescent. Many dinoflagellates are found in coastal waters including freshwater lakes, rivers, and bogs. Most dinoflagellates reproduce sexually. Dinoflagellates are geographically distributed in six of the seven continents excluding Antarctica.
Reference:https://www.britannica.com/science/dinoflagellate

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tnessler

Date

February 5, 2019 03:44 PM EST

Description

This microscopic organism was taken from a sample of water from the Castor Pond at the University of South Florida. This particular sample derives from an area of the water that was shaded by the neighboring trees. It had a peculiar shape with a single, narrow apical horn coming from the very top and two other horns branching off at the bottom. Details such as color and size were indistinguishable, however, this organism was observed at 100x magnification with a compound microscope. As this organism is a type of algae, they thrive in water- both fresh and salt water throughout the world. Certain dinoflagellates are the cause of red tide in Florida waters and possess bioluminescent qualities. Their flagella and animal-like features make this organism unique. This organism belongs to Domain Eukaryote, Phylum Dinoflagellata, Class Dinophyceae, Order Gonyaulacales, Family Ceratiaceae, Genus Ceratium.

Reference: https://www.britannica.com/science/Ceratium

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

patel_k_18

Date

February 5, 2019 05:30 PM EST

Description

Found in a water sample from Caster Beach at the University of South Florida. Microscopic protist with two flagella that are perpendicular to one another and horns. Greenish-yellow in color. About 100 micrometers in length. Found in the shaded area of Caster Beach. Classified as a dinoflagellate (since it has two flagella - a defining characteristic of dinoflagellates) under Kingdom Protista.

Observed at 5:30 PM on February 5, 2019 in a laboratory at University of South Florida. Water sample was obtained on February 3, 2019 from Caster Beach on a cloudy day. The temperature was 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

Found in temperate latitudes, high and low. This species is common in warmer tropical seas in lower altitudes.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/GeolSci/micropal/dinoflagellate.html
http://ezproxy.lib.usf.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.2836777&site=eds-live

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tammy_medrano

Date

February 4, 2019 05:13 PM EST

Description

Few dinoflagellates from castor beach at USF.
perpendicular flagellum are key dinoflagellate features for mobility

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

emilyblanton

Date

February 5, 2019

Description

Observed was a dinoflagellate that is believed to be Ceratium furca which came from a pond at Castor Beach located on the University of South Florida campus. The water in which this dinoflagellate was observed was taken from where there was a lot of light available. Dinoflagellates are unicellular eukaryotes. Most dinoflagellates live in the ocean, although there are some freshwater species. The dinoflagellate pictured is green in color and appears as a kind of trident shaped organism with two points at the top and a longer section towards the bottom, however I cannot specify size. Most dinoflagellates reproduce asexually through mitosis, and many dinoflagellates obtain nutrients from photosynthesis (although some are heterotrophs).
Reference: https://study.com/academy/lesson/dinoflagellates-characteristics-examples-classification.html

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Improving
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

renner_m_901

Date

February 5, 2019 03:19 PM EST

Description

Shown to 100x total magnification. Approx. 30 microns in length. No notable coloration, or cannot be seen in single organism/under microscope. Found in shaded/dark area of pond. Weather was sunny, hot. Size, habitat and body shape (angular, with three 'prongs') suggest a dinoflagellate (protists, phylum Dinoflagellata, abundant in both marine and freshwater environments). Reference: https://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/resources/identification/algae/identification-guide/identify/guide/descriptions/dinoflagellates

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gabrielle99

Date

March 2, 2019 11:43 AM EST

Description

Kingdom Protista. This pond water sample was taken from the USF pond in direct sunlight. There are green and yellow particles swimming through the water. The habitat it was taken from was an urban habitat. I looked at the water sample through a microscope at x40.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

Photos / Sounds

Observer

bitar_n_3

Date

February 4, 2019 02:50 PM EST

Description

There are several dinoflagellates in this picture, circled in the 2nd picture attached. They have a hard shell with a groove down the middle (usually where their flagella can sit), and the shell protrudes in two directions. They are very small, with this photo being taken at a magnification of around 40x, and have a tan-ish coloring.

Ceratiaceae - Photo (c) FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC-ND)
roman-evseev's ID: Family Ceratiaceae, a member of Dinoflagellates (Superclass Dinoflagellata)
Added on April 2, 2024
Supporting
Added as part of a taxon split

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