April 09, 2024

Tricky Little Myrtles Blog

The news:
Welcome to my new Blog about some of the members of the Myrtaceae family!

The why:
A little while back I did a journal post about tricky little myrtles in Denmark Shire. That was to help demystify the lesser known species of Myrtaceae that I might come across so I was more likely to photograph and identify them.

I was rewarded almost immediately when I came across a plant with tiny flowers that looked like a tricky little myrtle. It turned out to be Austrobaeckea pygmaea and it was the first iNat observation of the species!

Encouraged by this I decided to write more about the Myrtaceae family. iNat journal entries are not a good way to build a structured collection of posts so I decided to use Blogger instead.

Posted on April 09, 2024 11:40 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 15, 2024

Flora of Denmark WA - Andersonia

Updated 15/3/2024. Index to my other posts.

Andersonia is named after several botanists called Anderson.

The following table lists the Andersonia species which are shown by Florabase to have been collected in Denmark Shire. The second column shows whether the species was included in the book Flora of the South West and under what name if different.

Andersonia Species of Denmark WA
Species Included Notes
auriculata Yes
caerulea
(Foxtails)
Yes See note below
geniculata Yes As A. geniculata ms
Nuytsia 17:202–204, Fig. 3 (2007)
hammersleyana Yes As A. hammersleyana ms
Nuytsia 17:207–210, Fig. 5 (2007)
micrantha Yes
redolens Yes As A. redolens ms
Nuytsia 17:205–207, Fig. 4 (2007)
sp. Amabile Yes
sp. Frankland Yes
sp. Jamesii No See note below
sp. Mitchell River No See note below
sp. Virolens Yes
sprengelioides Yes

A. caerulea

This is a very variable species. This quote from Lemsom—Current Problems in the Taxonomy of Andersonia (Annals of Botany 77: 323–326, 1996), gives an indication why this is so:

“…the merging of seven taxa into A. caerulea R.Br. (Watson, 1962) resulting in a taxon with a broad range of variation, and a large volume of quite disparate material has since been referred to it. It now seems clear that A. caerulea sensu Watson (1962) encompasses several groups. While some of Watson’s recombinations might be justified from herbarium specimens, not all of his changes to A. caerulea are supported by observations of live plants.”

sp. Jamesii

Per Brenda Hammersley collection record: Erect to straggling, most plants 40–60 cm high, the tallest 1.2 m. Flowers deep blue, sepals pink. Confined to an area of very shallow sand and surface laterite. In Jarrah forest with Isopogon formosus, Astroloma pallidum, Grevillea depauperata and Agonis hypericifolia.

sp. Mitchell River

From Florabase profile: Low, spreading, cushion-like shrub, 0.05–0.4 m high. Fl. blue/blue-white-pink, Jun to Sep. Grey sand over laterite or granite.

Per Brenda Hammersley collection record: Spreading small shrub 30 to 40 cm. Flowers blue, sepals paler blue.

Posted on March 15, 2024 03:30 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 09, 2024

Tricky Little Myrtles of Denmark Shire

Updated 25/3/2024. Index to my other posts.

The purpose of this post is to provide some information about the lesser known plants in the Myrtaceae family which occur in Denmark Shire. The following genera are better known and not included: Astartea, Calytrix, Corymbia, Darwinia, Eucalyptus, Hypocalymma, Kunzea, Melaleuca, Taxandria and Verticordia.

Actinodium cunninghamii - Albany Daisy


(c) geoffbyrne, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Looking much more like a daisy than a myrtle, Actinodium cunninghamii is the only described specied of the genus. There is however an undescribed phrase name species which may occur in Denmark Shire though it doesn’t appear to have been collected there yet. It is distinguished by its smaller flowers, refer to thebeachcomber’s journal post for more information. Bottom line is if photographing this species be sure to get some measurements or something to provide scale!

Agonis theiformis


(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

The only remaining species in the Agonis genus in Denmark Shire other than the well known Agonis flexuosa - Western Australian Peppermint. The remaining species, all of which share the characterisitc of having 10 stamens, one opposite each petal and sepal, were moved into the Taxandria genus. This species has 3 or 4 stamens opposite each sepal and has broad leaves which are often a little twisted.

Austrobaeckea pygmaea


(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation


(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Formerly Baeckea pygmaea, this species was assigned to the new Austrobaeckea genus in Nuytsia 32:173–197 (2021). The inflorescences have peduncles 4–11 mm long with 1–3 flowers which have pedicels 1.5–2.5 mm long. The flowers are tiny, about 4mm across with between 10 and 25 stamens. With 10 stamens they can look like a Taxandria flower when viewed from the front but the stalks differentiate them.

It is worth noting that Flora of the South West and How to Know Western Australian Wildflowers both incorrectly assert that the species has 10 (or maximum 10) stamens. The Nuytsia article referred to above discusses this.

Chamelaucium floriferum ssp. diffusum


(c) Cal Wood, some rights reserved (CC BY) Observation

A diffuse shrub. The flowers have 10 stamens alternating with 10 antherless filaments which are narrowly triangular to linear. Limited distribution in the Walpole area.

Chamelaucium forrestii


(c) orchidup, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Found only in the Mount Frankland area, this species grows on granite outcrops. An erect shrub up to 2m high. The flowers droop on their stems and the style is exerted.

Conothamnus neglectus


(c) geoffbyrne, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

This is Melaleuca crispii on iNaturalist and does look like a Melaleuca. However, in Florabase and books it is in a different genus which makes it harder to identify.

Gaudium laevigatum (Coast Teatree)


(c) Loxley Fedec, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Common names include Coast Teatree and Australian Tea Tree. This is Leptospermum laevigatum on iNaturalist. It is native to the east coast of Australia, introduced in Western Australia and so far there are no iNat observations in Dennmark Shire.

Homalospermum firmum


(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation


(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

The only named species of Homalospermum. Quite large showy flowers with numerous stamens. The fruits are distinctive and good for identification in the absence of flowers.

Pericalymma genus

(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

There are three species, one divided into two variaties, that occur in Denmark Shire. This is a genus I plan to look at more closely next spring when they will be flowering. At present I will leave this entry at genus level. Shrubs with intricately divided branchlets and white or pink usually single small flowers. 10–25 stamens in a ring, shorter than the petals.

Rinzia schollerifolia


(c) Keith Morris, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Common name Cranberry Rinzia. Flowers are generally pink but can also be white. The 10 stamens are on flattened filaments and are quite distinctive.

Posted on March 09, 2024 07:47 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 07, 2024

Melaleucas that aren't!

Updated 8/3/2024. Index to my other posts.

The following table lists the plant species in the Denmark Shire which are included by iNaturalist as Melaleucas but by Florabase as other genera.

Species Melaleuca Notes
Beaufortia decussata transversa Gravel Bottlebrush
Beaufortia micrantha micrantha Little Bottlebrush
Beaufortia sparsa sparsa Swamp Bottlebrush
Calothamnus lateralis alilateralis
Calothamnus preissii preissii
Calothamnus scabridus cabrida
Calothamnus schaueri schaueri
Callistemon glaucus glauca Albany Bottlebrush or Swamp Bottlebrush
Conothamnus neglectus crispii Open shrub, 0.2–1 m high. Fl. yellow, Jul to Sep.
Posted on March 07, 2024 10:48 PM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 01, 2024

Sphenotoma Species and key

Updated 1/3/2024. Index to my other posts.

The purpose of this post is to gather some information about the Sphenotoma species and provide a key to facilitate their identification.

To assist with the Fitzgerald River and Surrounds project I have shown the relevant Local Government Areas in which the species occur (shires of Jerramungup, Kent, Lake Grace and Ravensthorpe):

Sphenotoma Species       Common name LGA
capitata J (not per Florabase but collected there),R
dracophylloides       J,R
drummondii Mountain Paper-heath       None
gracilis Swamp Paper-heath None
parviflora None
sp. Stirling Range None
squarrosa R



Key

  • Upper leaves of flowering shoots usually small, erect and appresed to stem
    • Lower leaves recurved (all leaves recurved on new growth): gracilis
    • Lower leaves not recurved
      • Lower leaves 40–80mm long, robust shrub in grevices on granite: drummondii
      • Lower leaves 35mm long or less
        • Corolla lobes 5–8mm long about equal to tube: capitata
        • Corolla lobes 2–3mm long much shorter than tube: parviflora
  • All leaves spreading
    • Bracts small: sp. Stirling Range
    • Bract large, especially in lower part of inflorescence
      • Corolla lobes 3–3.5mm long shorter than tube: squarrosa
      • Corolla lobes 5mm long about as long as tube: dracophylloides
        Note that leaves of squarrosa are longer than dracophylloides and recurved. Flower spikes of squarossa in spike whereas those of dracophylloides in almost globular head.
Posted on March 01, 2024 05:16 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

February 27, 2024

Calothamnus species in Fitzgerald River and surrounds

Updated 28/2/2024. Index to my other posts.

The purpose of this post is to gather some information about the Calothamnus species in Fitzgerald River and surrounds to facilitate their identification.

Twelve species of Calothamnus are shown by Florabase to be in the area (shires of Jerramungup, Kent, Lake Grace and Ravensthorpe). I have shown the Local Government Areas in which the species occur as the area is so large:

Calothamnus Species Melaleuca Species Common name LGA
affinis relativa J
gibbosus protumida J,LG.R
gracilis gracilis J,K,LG,R
huegelii caroli-huegelii J,K,LG,R
macrocarpus macrocarpa R
pinifolius peucophylla Dense Clawflower J,R
planifolius planifolia K
quadrifidus quadrifidus       quadrifida quadrifida       One-sided Bottlebrush J,K,LG,R
quadrifidus seminudus quadrifida seminuda One-sided Bottlebrush LG,R
roseus rosea R
sanquineus eriocarpa Silky-leaved Blood flower       J,
validus valida Barrens Clawflower J,R
villosus hislopii Silky Net-Bush J,K,R



Key

  • Floral parts 5
    • Hypanthium immersed in rachis
      • Stem thickened, corky: gibbosus
      • Stem slender, not corky: gracilis
    • Hypantium not immersed in rachis
      • Fruit 13–17mm long: macrocarpus
      • Fruit 10mm long or less: villosus
  • Floral parts 4
    • Hypanthium immersed in rachis
      • Leaves flat: planifolius
      • Leaves terete
        • Hypanthium fully or mostly immersed: huegelii
        • Hypanthium more than half free: affinis
    • Hypanthium not immersed in rachis
      • Staminal claws markedly unequal (and united for most of length): sanguineus
      • Staminal claws roughly equal
        • Leaves flat (possibly only very slightly): quadrifidus
          • Mature leaves glabrous: quadrifidus quadrifidus
          • Mature leaves scabrid or hairy: quadrifidus seminudus
        • Leaves terete
          • Leaves pungent: pinifolius
          • Leaves not pungent
            • Leaves 2.5–4.5cm long, stamens deep pink: roseus
            • Leaves 1.2–2.2cm long, stamens red: validus
Posted on February 27, 2024 06:52 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

February 22, 2024

Red Flowered Styphelia Species of Jurien Bay and Surrounds

Updated 26/2/2024. Index to my other posts.

The purpose of this post is to gather the available information about the red flowering Styphelia species in Jurien Bay and surrounds to facilitate their identification. Comments on this post are very welcome!

[At this stage this is a draft for comment. I will include some notes in square brackets which will hopefully be deleted as the post develops.]

Seven species of large leaved red flowering Styphelia in the area were identified by @thebeachcomber as follows:

Species Previous name Common name
Styphelia discolor Astroloma ciliatum Moss-leaved Heath or Candle Cranberry
Styphelia erubescens Leucopogon oxycedrus
Styphelia microcalx Astroloma microcalyx
Styphelia microdonta Astroloma microdonta Sandplain Cranberry
Styphelia serratifolia Astroloma serratifolium
Styphelia stomarrhena Astroloma stomarrhena Red Swamp Cranberry
Styphelia tortifolia Astroloma glaucescens

Of these species all are shown by Florabase to have been collected in the area except S. erubescens which is included in the Hi Vallee Field Guide. Hi Vallee farm is in the Jurien Bay and surrounds.

Styphelia discolor

There is a description for this species in Flora of the South West: Bunbury-Augusta-Denmark, in summary:
Shrub, ground hugging or up to 0.3m. Leaves narrowly oblong 5–11mm long and 0.5–1.5mm wide, hairless or sparsley hairy, flat to slightly convex, margin fringed with stiff hairs, tip a harsh point 0.5–1mm long. Flowers purple to dark red, corolla tube very long (20–30mm), lobes bearded and often paler than the tube.


Photo (c) robert davis, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

The flowers are very distinctive and I don’t think this species would cause confusion whilst in flower.

Styphelia erubescens

There is a description for this species in Flora of the South West: Bunbury-Augusta-Denmark, in summary:
Shrub to 1m. Leaves erect to spreading, narrowly elliptic to elliptic, 5–14mm long 2.5–3.5mm wide, flat, long-pointed and spine tipped. Flowers white in small drooping clusters of only 1 or 2 flowers, sepals ovate, rounded, 2–3.5mm long, much shorter than the corolla tube, corolla 7–14mm long, style exerted.

Adding to this, in the Jurien Bay area the flowers are red (Hi Vallee Field Guide) and the leaf margins are smooth and hairless (from looking at photos in Hi Vallee Field Guide and elsewhere).


(c) Shankar Meyer, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Styphelia microcalyx

Florabase profile of Astroloma microcalyx: Erect or straggling shrub, 0.2–0.6 m high. Fl. red/white, Jun to Sep. White or brown sand or loam, limestone, laterite. Coastal areas.

How To Know Western Australian Wild Flowers (Blackall & Grieve): Flowers large (about 15mm long), red, sepals minutely spiny tipped, 4–5mm long, bracteoles less than 2mm long. Leaves 20mm long usually glabrous but if margins are revolute they are ciliate.

Flora of the Perth Region has the following description:

Erect or diffuse shrub to .6m high, with branchlets minutely hairy. Leaves linear to narrowly oblong, 4–8 x 0.5–1 mm, glabrous, convex, mucronate with a mucro ca 1mm long, margins minutely denticulate, recurved to revolute; the upper leaves erect and the lower leaves spreading. Bracteoles broadly elliptic to circular, 1–2 mm long, minutely hairy, mucronate. Sepals elliptic, ca 5 mm long, glabrous or sparsely hairy towards the apex, mucronulate.

Corolla red or white, 10–13 mm long; tube nearly twice as long as the sepals. hairy at the throat, with 5 tufts of hairs inside near the base; lobes acuminate, bearded. Staminal filaments flattened. Mature drupes not seen.

Occurs usually on near-coastal limestone of the coastal plain from Yanchep to Fremantle. Also recorded from Lake Indoon.

Flowers June - August

This species is similar to A glaucescens, but the latter has longer, flat leaves with a shorter mucro and longer bracteoles and sepals.


Florabase profile picture for Astroloma microcalyx


(c) Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG), photographer J. Wrigley

Styphelia microdonta

[There is a description and drawings of this species in Blackall and Grieves however it is somewhat at odds with other descriptions, included here for discussion.]

Blackall and Grieves: Erect shrub 30–90cm high. Leaves 5–15mm long about 3mm wide denticulate, flat tapering to a pungent point. Flowers red nearly sessile 10mm long, sepals about half as long as corolla, corolla somewhat bulbous. Flowering Apr-Sept.

Hi Vallee Field Guide: Flowering Apr-Jun or Aug-Oct. Flowers red or pink, corolla tube wider at base than top. Leaf margins stiffly hairy. Low spreading shrub to 35cm tall.

Florabase profile description for Astroloma microdonta: Low spreading shrub, 0.1–0.35 m high. Fl. red/pink, Apr to Jun or Aug to Oct. White/grey or yellow sand over laterite. Sandplains.

Whilst “Flora of the Perth Region” does not have an entry for Styphelia microdonta there is the following footnote under the Styphelia pallida listing: “This Species is very similar to the more northern S microdonta which differs in having a shorter pink to red Corolla, more obtuse, deeply coloured sepals and more prominantly denticulate leaves”. Styphelia pallida is described as having narrowly ovate, elliptic or obovate leaves 7–18mm x 2–3.5mm, flat or concave, tapering gradually to a long pungent mucro ca 1.5mm long, margins denticulate to ciliate. A prostrate shrub to 0.3m.

[Thanks Russell for this]

Flora of the South West describes the leaves of Styphelia pallida as having margins fringed with sparse rigid hairs. Click through to Russell’s observation (linked beneath his photo below) and that is what you will see on the leaves.

This syntype of Styphelia microdonta found on ALA has exactly the same sort of hairs on the leaf margins.

[This syntype is a bit of a clincher, compare the leaves with Russ’ observation]


Florabase profile picture for Astroloma microdonta


(c) Russ Chambers, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Styphelia serratifolia

The description and drawings in Blackall & Grieves for this species are helpful. Shrub up to 1m high, a polymorphic species. Leaves ovate to broadly lanceolate, concave, prominently denticuate-serrated, may be recurved, spreading or erect. Flowers red, solitary in axils about 10mm long sepals about half the length of the corolla.

Blackall & Grieve has two varieties with quite different leaf shape and orientation but this differentiation no longer appears to apply. The important common feature of the leaves is, in any case, the serrated margins.



(c) geoffbyrne, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Styphelia stomarrhena

Hi Vallee Field Guide: Flowering Mar-Jul, flowers red corolla lobes spreading at the top, stamens protruding in a dense white wooly mass, hairy shrub to 0.6m tall.

Blackall and Grieves: Flowering May-Sept, flowers red, sepals hairy, anthers in a wooly mass, leaves sessile, lanceolate, concave, striate, tapering to a pungent point the drawings show quite long hairs.

In flower this species is quite distinctive.



(c) robert davis, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Styphelia tortifolia

Hi Vallee Field Guide: Flowering period Mar or May to Oct. Flowers red corolla tube swollen, leaves grey green. Plant is glabrous (not hairy) or slightly pubescent. Pungent shrub to 0.6m tall.

Florabase profile of Astroloma glaucescens: Erect, compact, pungent shrub, 0.1–0.6 m high. Fl. red, Mar or May to Oct. Sandy & lateritic gravelly soils.

Name - Australian Systematic Botany, 2020, 33, 137–168: From the Latin tortus (twisted) and folium (leaf), a reference to the longitudinally twisted leaves that are a common feature of this species.



(c) Tim Hammer, some rights reserved (CC BY-NC) Observation

Posted on February 22, 2024 12:06 PM by boobook99 boobook99 | 3 comments | Leave a comment

November 15, 2023

Flora of Denmark WA - Leptocarpus

Leptocarpus from the Greek lepto, thin and carpus, fruited.

The following table lists the Leptocarpus species which are shown by Florabase to have been collected in Denmark Shire. The second column shows whether the species was included in the book Flora of the South West and under what name if different. There were many changes to the genus, transfers mainly from Meeboldina, as a result of an article in Telopea Vol 16 19–41 (2014).

Leptocarpus Species of Denmark WA
Species Included Notes
coangustatus Yes As Meeboldina coangustata
denmarkicus Yes As Meeboldina denmarkica
laxus Yes As Leptocarpus diffusus
roycei Yes As Meeboldina roycei
scariosus Yes As Meeboldina scariosa
scoparius Yes As Stenotalis ramosissima
tenax
(Slender Twine Rush)
Yes
tephrinus Yes As Meeboldina tephrina
thysananthus Yes As Meeboldina thysanantha ms
Posted on November 15, 2023 11:26 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 2 comments | Leave a comment

October 29, 2023

Flora of Denmark WA - Sphaerolobium

Sphaerolobium from the greek sphaera, ball and lobion, pod.

The following table lists the Sphaerolobium species which are shown by Florabase to have been collected in Denmark Shire. The second column shows whether the species was included in the book Flora of the South West and under what name if different. If the species was described after Flora of the South West was published, the paper describing the species is noted. Where a species is not included in Flora of the South West I have endeavored to provide some sort of description after the table.

Sphaerolobium Species of Denmark WA
Species Included Notes
alatum Yes
benetectum No Nuytsia 13:450–453,Fig.1 (2001)
calcicola No Austral.Syst.Bot. 17:431–434, Fig. 5 (2004)
drummondii Yes See note below
Austral.Syst.Bot. 14:155–173 (2001)
fornicartum Yes
grandiflorum Yes
hygrophilum No Austral.Syst.Bot. 17:434–438, Fig. 7 (2004)
linophyllum Yes
macranthum No See note below
Austral.Syst.Bot. 14:155–173 (2001)
medium Yes
nudiflorum Yes
pubescens Yes
rostratum Yes
vimineum Yes

S. benetectum

This species is thought to be extremely rare and is known from only three populations, one of which may be extinct. In Denmark Shire collections have only been made from one location in the Mount Lindesay area. There do not appear to be any photos of the species publicly available.

Apparently leafless shrub (leaves are shed before flowering). Inflorescence of paired, axillary flowers,
Calyx mid to dark green with irregular black spots over surface, the spots may aggregate at margins of lobe. The tube about half as long as the upper lip.

Corolla yellow-orange and pink to red; standard yellow-orange with a red eye which is oblong with a flared apex. Wings pink-red. Keel yellow and red, longer than the wings,

S. drummondii is similar but can be distinguished from S. benetectum as its flowers are, in the Denmark area, pink-purple and cream and the standard eye is domed to heart shaped rather than oblong.

S. calcicola

One collection has been made on the southern side of the Wilson Inlet (Nullaki). Apart from this all collections have been made considerably north of Denmark - between 25km north of Bunbury and 55km north of Perth. It is therefore possible the species may be found in Denmark Shire but is likely to be rare. It grows in limestone based soils which would restrict the locations it might be found.

Calyx green with irregular black spots over surface, the spots may aggregate at margins of lobe. The tube half to three quarters as long as the upper lip.

Corolla mostly yellow and red, some cream. The standard petal is yellow with broad red region in centre surrounding a triangular yellow eye. A red region in the centre of the back of the standard petal fades to yellow on the edges. The wings are mainly red, dark orange at the tips and yellow just at base. The keel is usually shorter than the wings and is cream to pale yellow sometimes with pink red spots or areas.

S. drummondii

When the book was written it was recognised that there had been confusion between S. drummondii and S. macranthum. What was not clear until a little later was that both species occur in the area covered by the book but are quite distinct. In particular the calyx of S. drummondii is green with irregular black spots whereas that of S. macranthum is pale green to brown with fine brown spots over the lobes but not the tube.

In addition, collections of S. drummondii from jarrah woodland and southern heath communities (including Denmark Shire) are typically thinner-stemmed with smaller pink-purple and cream flowers (the species exhibits different colours in other locations). The flowers of S. macranthum on the other hand are yellow or yellow and red.

S. hygrophilum

This species has been widely collected across Denmark Shire.

Calyx green with irregular black spots over surface, the spots aggregate at margins of lobe to form black lines along lower edges of upper lip and lower edges of upper 2 lower lobes. The tube about equal to or slightly longer than the upper lip.

Corolla orange-red to pink-red and cream; standard pink-red or dark orange with broad red region in centre and with a yellow eye, wings deep pink-red, keel cream with pink red spots or infused areas or all pink-red, usually longer than the wings.

S. hygrophilum is distinct from similar species S. fornicatum and S. calcicola in floral colour, being predominantly deep pink-red compared with yellow and red; in the shape of the standard petal eye, which is elongate and flared at apex (but not extending to the apex of the blade as in S. fornicatum) such that it is inversely triangular in appearance.

S. macranthum

As explained above, this species was not included in the book. It is a yellow or yellow and red flowered species similar to S. drummondii.

What makes this species quite distinct from S. drummondii is that the calyx lacks distict dark spots on surface (which are present on S. drummondii). The calyx is pale green to brown with fine brown spots on the lobes but not the tube. Tube shorter or equal in length to upper lip.

The corolla is mainly yellow sometimes with some red. In the Denmark area the basal half to the entirety of the wing petals is red.

Posted on October 29, 2023 06:40 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

July 12, 2023

Flora of Denmark WA - Hypolaena

Hypolaena from the Greek hypo, under and chlaina, a cloak. Refers to the glumes at the base of the spikes.

The following table lists the Hypolaena species which are shown by Florabase to have been collected in Denmark Shire. The second column shows whether the species was included in the book Flora of the South West and under what name if different.

Hypolaena Species of Denmark WA
Species Included Notes
caespitosa Yes As H. caespitosa ms
Described in Telopea 10:576,Figs 2A-D (2004)
exsulca Yes
fastigiata Yes
grandiuscula No Described in Telopea 10:576–579,Figs 3A-E (2004)
pubescens Yes

H. grandiuscula

From Telopea: Hypolaena grandiuscula resembles H. fastigiata in its ascending rhizomes and general habit, but differs in the slender orange-brown female spikelets with tepals to 4 mm long (when fruiting) and males with glumes all fertile. It occurs in the south-west of Western Australia on sandy soils from near Busselton to east of Denmark but appears to be rare throughout its range. Hypolaena fastigiata has dark red-brown female spikelets with tepals to 1 mm long and males with few to many sterile lower glumes per spikelet; it occurs in the south of Western Australia and in eastern Australia from South Australia and Victoria to Tasmania, and through coastal districts to south-eastern Queensland.

Posted on July 12, 2023 05:31 AM by boobook99 boobook99 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

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