Activating for Citizen Science's Journal

January 14, 2022

December 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 8,159 (8056 in Australia alone)
Species 2,616
Identifiers 632
Observers 64 (18 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

Where have our observations been made?

Over 2021 our group of 96 observers have contributed an amazing number of observations! together we have contributed 102,906 observations of 9,611 species. With 20 users contributing over 1000 observations, with the most observed organism being the Australian Magpie.

For the latest stats check out the December Challenge-Updated Stats

The 64 Australian observers contributing this month was an increase on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 7.9 % of all observations within Australia over the month of December (at time of writing). While the 58 observers constituted only around 1.1% of all Australian iNaturalists observers active during the month .
In an amazing trend, December was the fifth time Australian iNaturalist observations exceeded 100,000 for a month, this has been a consistent pattern since September 2021 for the second time, exceeded the previous high by around 20, 000! it is fantastic to see such amazing engagement

this member of the 'True Velvet Mites' Mesothrombium sp. was spotted by the ever-alert @natashataylor© Natasha Taylor, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC) and identified with some help from @owen_seeman

The most observed species December 2021


©donnamareetomkinson, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)
@donnamareetomkinson
The most observed species is the Dainty Green Tree Frog Ranoidea gracilenta with 97 observations through the month

Interestingly there was also 182 observations of threatened species registered across our network during December 2021. This included amphibians, Marsupials, birds, butterflies and several plant species.

For the latest results of the current Month check the
December Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
December Challenge-Updated Stats
October Challenge-Updated Stats
September Challenge-Updated Stats
August Challenge-Updated Stats
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.
Check out the review blog 'That's it! Thanks Everyone! GSB 2021 Overview' by Peter , and leave a comment if you like it!
For those more grapphicly minded check out the results page 2021 highlights by @larissabrazsousa

Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

check out last years project here Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2020



@gregtasney @natashataylor @twan3253 @stephen169 @scottwgavins @ethan241 @hatwise @ludwig_muller @nyoni-pete @zachmalcomson @donnamareetomkinson @streglystendec @martin487 donna391
@anthonypaul @joswan12 @fairypossum @rodolfosalinas @leithallb @rsmalley @karenweaving62 @luis615 @rwl @grisper1 @pam275 @rich_fuller @sarinozi @chrisseager @aavankampen @nswanson @mary-a-crawf @owen65 @ethan_yeoman @larissabrazsousa @thbata1 @timothyshields @jacksonnugent @archgully @dragonette @sandy_horne @carl_ramirez @jeannie_bartram @danielthelion @bigpete @ellurasanctuary @adel_plainsgirl @melbo @naturemum101 @benfish @mj_taylor @seamus-doherty @littlellama @the_spangled_drongo @nikonoid @t-zeke @verna29 @coletteh @jennifer512 @diondior @natrydd @heathwallum @sandyp09 @co2co @bbrice @rubbery @diannezchilds @stekmer @mnetting @ichigo_ @rossivdb @teynomi @sammybee @savurs @alazm @gagars @jjr_photography_and_media @tonyandreata @reef_scientist @elfir @nancy1911 @becstummer @cheshirevixen @kdankiw @mozziemike @cat80 @mickey63 @fossil1513 @marionmackenzie @ourbeaches @craig_williams @mandyshepherd @wayneshore @christinejunewhite @david_k @vinialota @evdchijs

Posted on January 14, 2022 11:12 by stephen169 stephen169 | 2 comments | Leave a comment

December 15, 2021

November 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 6480 (6387 in Australia)
Species 2146
Identifiers 525
Observers 60 (19 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

where have our observations been made?

For the latest stats check out the November Challenge-Updated Stats

The 58 Australian observers contributing this month was an increase on the previous month by 10 users. Together our observations accounted for around 6.2 % of all observations within Australia over the month of September (at time of writing). While the 58 observers constituted only around 1% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
November was the third time observations exceeded 100,000 for a month, this follows on from September when it did this for the second time, exceeded the previous high by around 20, 000! it is fantastic to see such amazing engagement

exceeding 100K observations

In October 2021 Australian onsevations on iNaturalist exceeded 100K for only the Third time this follows on from September when Australian observations exceeded 100K for the second time

Red Triangle Slug Triboniophorus graeffei © Greg Tasney, some rights reserved (CC-BY-SA)

For the latest results of the current Month check the
December Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
October Challenge-Updated Stats
September Challenge-Updated Stats
August Challenge-Updated Stats
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Some amazing flying Ducks

towards the end of the month, it appears that Mike (@streglystendec ) came across several Large Flying Duck Orchid Caleana major Near trail among native shrubs and eucalypt on sandy soil.

He also found some Small Duck Orchid Caleana minor

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere.
How did we go?
Check out the review blog 'That's it! Thanks Everyone! GSB 2021 Overview' by Peter , and leave a comment if you like it!
For those more grapphicly minded check out the results page 2021 highlights by @larissabrazsousa

Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

check out last years project here Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2020
The most observed species is the Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog with 97 observations through the month

Just outside the #GSB2021, but a great observation A first for iNat recorded last weekend in October 'Acupalpa glossa' not the best photos but hey. Thanks, @shaun-winterton for the ID, and @phycus for tagging him.


sorry for the short post this month!

Greg Tasney
I got up early for a trip to Mt Edwards to complete the Moogerah Peaks trifecta. I mostly stuck to the path and found that Mt Edwards had less plant diversity than the other two peaks. The walk from start to end wasn't easy. Tough on the heart on the way up and tough on the knees on the way down. It was 30 degrees, very humid and the path is steep and heavily eroded. I saw not one person in 4 hours...excellent!

Posted on December 15, 2021 11:45 by stephen169 stephen169 | 2 comments | Leave a comment

November 13, 2021

October 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 14, 066 (13,871 in Australia)
Species 3, 300
Identifiers 706
Observers 71 (31 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

where have our observations been made?

For the latest stats check out the October Challenge-Updated Stats

The 61 Australian observers contributing this month was an increase on the previous month by 10 users. Together our observations accounted for around 7.1 % of all observations within Australia over the month of September (at time of writing). While the 51 observers constituted only around 1.1% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
September 2021, was the second time observations exceeded 100,000 for a month for the second time, with the previous record exceeded by around 20, 000! it is fantastic to see such amazing engagement

Australian observations in September exceeded 100K for only the second time


Large Flying Duck Orchid Caleana major © Greg Tasney, some rights reserved (CC-BY-SA)

For the latest results of the current Month check the
NovemberChallenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
October Challenge-Updated Stats
September Challenge-Updated Stats
August Challenge-Updated Stats
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere.
How did we go?
Unoficail Overview
183,443 observations
21,048 species
3,227 Identifiers
5,789 Observers

Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

check out last years project here Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2020
The most observed species is the Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog with 97 observations through the month

Just outside the #GSB2021, but a great observation A first for iNat recorded last weekend in October 'Acupalpa glossa' not the best photos but hey. Thanks, @shaun-winterton for the ID, and @phycus for tagging him.


Acupalpa glossa

sorry for the short post this month!

Posted on November 13, 2021 10:52 by stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

October 13, 2021

September 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 8, 671 ( 8,541 in Australia)
Species 2, 437
Identifiers 527
Observers 61 (23 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @streglystendec @twan3253 @stephen169 @ethan241 @hatwise @nyoni-pete @karenweaving62 @aavankampen @chrisseager @leithallb @zachmalcomson @rsmalley @sarinozi @rwl @rodolfosalinas @anthonypaul @nswanson @owen65 @mj_taylor @martin487 @pam275 @melbo @thbata1 @mary-a-crawf @rich_fuller

where have our observations been made?

For the latest stats check out the September Challenge-Updated Stats

The 61 Australian observers contributing this month was an increase on the previous month by 10 users. Together our observations accounted for around 7.1 % of all observations within Australia over the month of September (at time of writing). While the 51 observers constituted only around 1.1% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
September 2021, was the second time observations exceeded 100,000 for a month for the second time, with the previous record exceeded by around 20, 000! it is fantastic to see such amazing engagement

Australian observations in September exceeded 100K for only the second time

The most observed species observed in the month was Ornate Burrowing Frog Platyplectrum ornatum (below © Greg Tasney ) with 77 observations, all made by Greg. find out more about this species here

For the latest results of the current Month check the
OctoberChallenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
September Challenge-Updated Stats
August Challenge-Updated Stats
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere.
So far this year we have a massive contingent with 19 countries represented and 138 areas included! so i encourage you all to join in!
Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

check out last years project here Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2020

we have had some great contributions this month including some amazing observations by Sandy Horne (@sandy_horne ) who is active on Twitter if you are on the platform i encourage you to follow her @SandyHorne61


Above left, Adelaide Rosella Platycercus elegans ssp. adelaidae Sandy Horne, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC) right, Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita
we have had some othe amazing observatiosn localy in south Australia with
@anthonypaul again showing his amazing observation skills with these two amazing observations

Phytotrypa pretiosella left and Grey Fantail Rhipidura albiscapa right© anthonypaul, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)

have you hear of the #BirdsSeenIn2021 - Hashtag Challenge

Calling all Australian birders/bird photographers. To find out which species are missing from the #BirdsSeenIn2021 year list for Australia . Can you help to fill in the blanks by tweeting photos taken this year with the hashtag during the Great Southern Bioblitz?

Please remember selecting the appropriate copyright is important, we recommend that you select a default that allows observations to be loaded to GBIF

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1 @nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller @rwl @fairypossum @nikonoid @anthonypaul @leithallb @luis615 @pam275 @ethan_yeoman @sandy_horne @grisper1 @timothyshields @jacksonnugent @chrisseager @mary-a-crawf @seamus-doherty @the_spangled_drongo @bigpete @heathwallum @jeannie_bartram @elfir @ichigo_ @natrydd @craig_williams @dragonette @marionmackenzie @sammybee @savurs


Posted on October 13, 2021 12:24 by stephen169 stephen169 | 1 comment | Leave a comment

September 15, 2021

August 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 7,011 ( 6866 in Australia)
Species 1917
Identifiers 453
Observers 53 ( 27 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @streglystendec @twan3253 @stephen169 @ethan241 @hatwise @nyoni-pete @karenweaving62 @aavankampen @chrisseager @leithallb @zachmalcomson @rsmalley @sarinozi @rwl @rodolfosalinas @anthonypaul @nswanson @owen65 @mj_taylor @martin487 @pam275 @melbo @thbata1 @mary-a-crawf @rich_fuller

For the latest stats check out the August Challenge-Updated Stats

The 51 Australian observers contributing this month was a decrease on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 9.5 % of all observations within Australia (72,482) over the month of August (at time of writing). While the 51 observers constituted only around 1.2% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
The most observed species observed in the month was The Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula (below © Greg Tasney )

For the latest results of the current Month check the
August Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
August Challenge-Updated Stats
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere
Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

Please remember selecting the appropriate copyright is important, we recommend that you select a default that allows observations to be loaded to GBIF

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1 @nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller @rwl @fairypossum @nikonoid @anthonypaul @leithallb @luis615 @pam275 @ethan_yeoman @sandy_horne @grisper1 @timothyshields @jacksonnugent @chrisseager @mary-a-crawf @seamus-doherty @the_spangled_drongo @bigpete @heathwallum @jeannie_bartram @elfir @ichigo_ @natrydd @craig_williams @dragonette @marionmackenzie @sammybee @savurs

Posted on September 15, 2021 12:46 by stephen169 stephen169 | 2 comments | Leave a comment

August 08, 2021

July 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 5,333 ( 5059 in Australia)
Species 1722
Identifiers 427
Observers 46 ( 19 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1
@nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller

For the latest stats check out the July Challenge-Updated Stats

The 43 Australian observers contributing this month was a decrease on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 8.8 % of all observations within Australia (56, 937) over the month of June (at time of writing). While the 43 observers constituted only around 1.3% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
The most observed species observed in the month was the Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen (below © Zach Malcomson, all rights reserved)

For the latest results of the current Month check the
August Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere
Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

This month we have som amazing observations from Richard Fuller (@rich_fuller), originally from the UK, he moved to Australia in 2008. Travelled quite a bit, but becoming more and more interested in local natural history, particularly in Brisbane where he is based. It looks like he has had the oppertunity to head up to the north of Queensland over the month and taken some amazing observations check out his observations for July here

Euploea eichhorni(left), Gram Blue Euchrysops cnejus (right) observed by Richard Fuller, (@rich_fuller),

With the cooler weather in the south, it's a Fungi bonanza and Michael Burrell (@streglystendec) is definitely one to take inspiration from in South Australia, have a look at Mikes July observations here


Ramaria lorithamnus (top left), Pixie's Parasol Mycena interrupta (top right)
Peeling Oysterling Crepidotus mollis (bottom left) and Sulphur Tuft Hypholoma fasciculare (bottom right)
Mike also recorded two occurrences of Neobarya agaricicola which are the first observations of this species in South Australia (below). It is commonly observed in Victoria and New Zealand with a few observations in Tasmania. It is a small fungus that is found colonizing other fungi. One to look out for in the future to see if it is more widespread in S.A. this was mentioned in the comments below., thanks @streglystendec

Last month Michael also found the shell of Emmalena gawleri (Brazier, 1872) in Belair National Park (below). They are a native carnivorous land snail that are not often observed due to their cryptic habitat. Only 4 observations are recorded in iNaturalist – 1 live specimen and 3 dead shells. Distribution: Mt Lofty Ranges and coastal environs to the South Flinders Ranges, South East South Australia (Australian Land Snails Volume 2).

Please remember selecting the appropriate copyright is important, we recommend that you select a default that allows observations to be loaded to GBIF

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1 @nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller @rwl @fairypossum @nikonoid @anthonypaul @leithallb @luis615 @pam275 @ethan_yeoman @sandy_horne @grisper1 @timothyshields @jacksonnugent @chrisseager @mary-a-crawf @seamus-doherty @the_spangled_drongo @bigpete @heathwallum @jeannie_bartram @elfir @ichigo_ @natrydd @craig_williams @dragonette @marionmackenzie @sammybee @savurs

Posted on August 08, 2021 07:10 by stephen169 stephen169 | 6 comments | Leave a comment

July 11, 2021

100,000 observations from 60 users

Hey everyone what a fantastic achievement, the group has passed 100, 000 observations!

This has included observations from around Australia and beyond, I am truly amazed at the diversity we have discovered. Please let me know what is your favourite observation or species in the comments below.
The most commonly observed organism with 807 observations is the Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen in fact the top 5 are all birds! Have a look at all the 10,174 species we have catalogued here.


Magpie observed by
@twan3253 Mount Tomah NSW 2758, Australia
Unsurprisingly The European Honey Bee Apis mellifera with 447 observations has been the most commonly observed insect. However, the much more interesting Common Evening Brown Melanitis leda is not far behind with 304 observations






Posted on July 11, 2021 12:09 by stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

July 09, 2021

June 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 5651 ( 5339 in Australia)
Species 1597
Identifiers 391
Observers 56 ( 18 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @ethan241 @grisper1 @stephen169 @donnamareetomkinson @twan3253 @ ludwig_muller @zachmalcomson @hatwise @hatwise @thbata1 @karenweaving62 @nyoni-pete @leithallb @rodolfosalinas @rwl@anthonypaul

For the latest stats check out the July Challenge-Updated Stats

The 53 Australian observers contributing this month was a slight increase on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 9.7 % of all observations within Australia (54, 668) over the month of June (at time of writing). While the 53 observers constituted only around 1.6% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.

For the latest results of the current Month check the
June Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to

May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary


Wedge-tailed Eagle Aquila audax and a Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita observed by © anthonypaul,

How good is Greg?

How good is it when you find a plant, particularly a fern that you cannot for the life of you identify and the person who the species is named after identifies the observation?

Rasp Fern Blechnum parrisiae observed by @gregtasney, Lockyer, Gatton, Queensland

Blechnum parrisiae - Rasp Fern. "Etymology: Named in honour of Barbara Sydney Parris (1945–), New Zealand pteridologist with a special interest in Doodia and gammitid ferns".
@barbaraparris Found at Helidon Hills.
Interestingly @donnamareetomkinson came across dozens of Orange Bushbrown Mycalesis terminus beside a creek on Portland Rd, Lockhart that they stopped at.

Orange Bushbrown Mycalesis terminus observed by @donnamareetomkinson, Lockhart QLD

left Painted Grasshawk Neurothemis stigmatizans and Grass Skippers Subfamily Hesperiinae observed by ©donnamareetomkinson in Cook, QLD, Australia

jumping spider probably Genus Cosmophasis observed by ©donnamareetomkinson in Cook, QLD, Australia

with the City Nature Challenge held over the first weekend of May this month it will be amazing to see what we find!

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@sarinozi @chrisseager @streglystendec @owen65 @aavankampen @melbo @dragonette @jeannie_bartram @carl_ramirez @nswanson @verna29 @ellurasanctuary @larissabrazsousa @sandy_horne @heathwallum @seamus-doherty @mickey63 @rubbery @natrydd @fairypossum
@gagars @bbrice @diondior @elfir @marionmackenzie @strawberry15

Posted on July 09, 2021 14:03 by stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 17, 2021

New Annotation: Evidence of Presence

in case you missed it a new type of annotation called Evidence of Presence has just been introduced to iNaturalist, and originated from suggestions by members of the iNaturalist community. Check out the forum post about it!

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/new-annotation-evidence-of-presence/23945

The criteria we used to decide which types of evidence to include for the rollout:

Will most people understand what the term means?
Is it commonly observed and relevant to a broad group of taxa?
Will it noticeably improve parts of iNaturalist such as the taxon photo browser, searches, or collection projects?

Evidence of Presence annotations will only appear for observations within Kingdom Animalia 1 (except for humans), and there are six possible values at launch, defined as follows:

Organism: Whole or partial organism.
Scat: Fecal matter (not owl pellets or other regurgitated matter).
Track: Impression in ground or snow made by an organism.
Feather (within Aves only): One or more feathers not attached to an organism.
Molt (within Arthropoda and Reptilia only): Discarded skin or exoskeleton.
Bone (within Vertebrata only): Predominantly endoskeletal remains. Partial bone exposure in an otherwise intact organism should be labeled “organism”.

Posted on June 17, 2021 14:48 by stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 06, 2021

May 2021 Challenge summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 8,053 (7,611 in Australia)
Species 2330
Identifiers 515
Observers 50 (22 with more than 50 observations, and I note the double Greg by @gregtasney is that even a thing?)

@gregtasney @stephen169 @natashataylor @ethan241 @ludwig_muller @zachmalcomson @grisper1 @hatwise @streglystendec @mary-a-crawf @dragonette @sarinozi @aavankampen @ethan_yeoman @anthonypaul @rich_fuller @pam275 @bigpete @luis615 @adel_plainsgirl @bigpete @leithallb @seamus-doherty @melbo

For the latest stats check out the June Challenge-Updated Stats

This while only 50 observers contributed this month an increase on the previous month, together our observations accounted for around 10 % of all observations within Australia (74, 433) over the month of April (at time of writing). While the 50 observers constituted only 1.3% of all active observers iNaturalists within Australia. With the City Nature Challenge being held earlier in the month a higher number of observations would have been expected. However, this year there was no coordinated promotion of the event due to third parties being involved. While disappointing, I hope this issue can be resolved.

For the latest results of the current Month check the
June Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
Maysummary
April summary
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern Bioblitz

Check out the engagement project the Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2021
The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring, this will be the second year we have run the event.

​The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year!

The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere.

Use #GSB2021 #GreatSouthernBioblitz on social media
Great Southern Bioblitz website

Updated Banner pic

I have chosen this wonderful pair of Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae © anthonypaul

@ellurasanctuary was excited by this find back in early May a big one at around ~19mm, an Adelaide Unicorn Beetle Novapus adelaidae. Who says Unicorns don't exist? this is one of three observed on their property in rural South Australia.

A female Adelaide Unicorn Beetle Novapus adelaidae © Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach Conservation Park,
This was recently paired with a male, Marie's second find, this time alive though :-)
Considerably smaller than the previous one at ~17mm (the previous specimen was ~21mm)

A male Adelaide Unicorn Beetle Novapus adelaidae © Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach Conservation Park,

I was at Cox Scrub Conservation Park, South Australia in late May and found this wonderous Hare Orchid Leporella fimbriata © Stephen Fricker, certainly a highlight of the walk


This was not the only interesting find! with plenty of floral resources about there were several butterflies and moths about the park, despite the cool weather such as the Australian Painted Lady Vanessa kershawi (left) and this Common Grass-Blue Zizina otis ssp. labradus (right) #ownpic


I also observed some quite large wasp species Foraging in the low scrub.

I have been and will be quite busy so please send me your best observations and I will include them in my next post.

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@sarinozi @chrisseager @streglystendec @owen65 @aavankampen @melbo @dragonette @jeannie_bartram @carl_ramirez @nswanson @verna29 @ellurasanctuary @larissabrazsousa @sandy_horne @heathwallum @seamus-doherty @mickey63 @rubbery @natrydd @fairypossum
@gagars @bbrice @diondior @elfir @marionmackenzie @strawberry15


Posted on June 06, 2021 00:54 by stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

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